A Message From The Art Of Monteque

 

Dear The Art Of Monteque Community,

These are unprecedented times. With an overwhelming number of closures and cancellations in regards to COVID-19, The Art Of Monteque Team understands how difficult it can be to navigate this new and frightening world. The uncertainty is the most consistent part of our present condition. At this difficult and worry filled time, The Art Of Monteque Team are thinking about every one of you and we are sending you our love and support. We know isolation is painful, inconvenient, lonely, and for many financially destructive. We know the anxiety, worry and fear is overwhelming. Some of us know people who are already sick, or are sick ourselves. And it’s especially hard to face a moment like this one not knowing what may lay ahead of us in the future.

The Art Of Monteque is here for you in the best way we know how: by supporting the art community and independent artist. There’s nothing to stop us from supporting the arts and showcasing wonderfully unique artistic voices, not even the COVID-19 can stop us.

At a time when so many employers are abandoning their workers, we are dedicating ourselves wholeheartedly to taking care of our staff of volunteers. Our volunteers live around the world and are dedicated to showcasing the arts; some of whom are actually dealing with the COVID-19 or the ramifications of it. Of course, we’re all working from home, and trying our best to helping each other. The Art Of Monteque believes that if we want a society that takes care of its people, we have to do that as an organization. The Art Of Monteque Team wants to let you know that you are not alone. We are with you even if you can’t see us and to let you know that we all will get through this together. Please if you do not have to go outside for any reason please stay inside. It is up to us to keep each and everyone of us safe. Protect yourself and others from getting sick.

We have some tips from the CDC on how to keep yourself safe below, but these are the basics:

  • Stay home if you can and avoid gatherings of more than ten people.

  • Practice social distancing by keeping a distance of about six feet from others if you must go out in public.

  • Stock up on supplies.

  • Stay home as much as you can and avoid crowds as much as possible. Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others.

  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.

  • Have enough household items and groceries on hand so that you will be prepared to stay at home for a period of time.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, handles, desks, computers, phones, keyboards, sinks, toilets, faucets and countertops.

Please take care of yourself and each other. It may seem like dark times, but together we can withstand anything. Please have compassion, consideration, understanding and empathy for all those around you and and those of our global community. We hope you are all staying healthy and safe.

All our best to you and yours for a bright tomorrow .

Sincerely

The Art Of Monteque Team

P.S We know you’re giving to many other important causes right now. But if you are able to make a small donation to support our volunteer staff and their hard work in the face of this crisis, we’d be so grateful. We are with you and are willing to support you in the best ways we can.

 

CDC COVID-19 Safety Tips and Guidelines

According to the CDC, COVID-19 symptoms include fever, shortness of breath and a cough. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure. Call your doctor for medical advice if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop symptoms.

According to the CDC, early information shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this virus. This includes older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes and lung disease.

If you are at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19 because of your age or a serious medical condition, it is extra important for you to take actions to avoid getting sick.

Stay home as much as you can and avoid crowds as much as possible. Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others.

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid close contact

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Put distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Wear A Face Mask If You Are Sick

  • If you are sick: You should wear a face mask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a face mask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a face mask if they enter your room.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a face mask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a face mask). Face masks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • To disinfect:
    Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work. Use disinfectants appropriate for the surface.

Options include:

  • Diluting your household bleach.
    To make a bleach solution, mix:

    • 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water
      OR
    • 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water

    Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.

  • Alcohol solutions.
    Ensure solution has at least 70% alcohol.
  • Other common EPA-registered household disinfectants.
    Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens pdf icon

Clothing, towels, linens and other items that go in the laundry

  • Wear disposable gloves when handling dirty laundry from an ill person and then discard after each use. If using reusable gloves, those gloves should be dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and should not be used for other household purposes. Clean hands immediately after gloves are removed.
    • If no gloves are used when handling dirty laundry, be sure to wash hands afterwards.
    • If possible, do not shake dirty laundry. This will minimize the possibility of dispersing virus through the air.
    • Launder items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
    • Clean and disinfect clothes hampers according to guidance above for surfaces. If possible, consider placing a bag liner that is either disposable (can be thrown away) orcan be laundered.

Washing Your Hands

  • Household members should clean hands often, including immediately after removing gloves and after contact with an ill person, by washing hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available and hands are not visibly dirty, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol may be used. However, if hands are visibly dirty, always wash hands with soap and water.
  • Household members should follow normal preventive actions while at work and home including recommended hand hygiene and avoiding touching eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Additional key times to clean hands include:
      • After blowing one’s nose, coughing, or sneezing
      • After using the restroom
      • Before eating or preparing food
      • After contact with animals or pets
      • Before and after providing routine care for another person who needs assistance (e.g. a child)

Caring For The Sick

The ill person should eat/be fed in their room if possible. Non-disposable food service items used should be handled with gloves and washed with hot water or in a dishwasher. Clean hands after handling used food service items.

  • If possible, dedicate a lined trash can for the ill person. Use gloves when removing garbage bags, handling, and disposing of trash. Wash hands after handling or disposing of trash.
  • Consider consulting with your local health department about trash disposal guidance if available.

Additional Resources

https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

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